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Visual Art Syllabus

Robert Duncan, Visual Art Teacher
West Jessamine High School
Robert.duncan@jessamine.kyschools.US
(859) 887-2421, extension 3743

Schedule. First Semester/Second Semester:

  • 1st: Art I/Art II

  • 2nd. Advance Art/AP Studio/Portfolio Development

  • 3rd. Plan/Plan

  • 4th. Drawing/Painting

  • 5th. Art I/Art II

  • 6th. Art I/II

Visual art classes taught at West Jessamine High School include:

  • Art I. Art I is a basic comprehensive course emphasizing a concentrated study of the Principles and Elements of Design, composition and color theory. Work will be primarily two-dimensional with some exploration of three-dimensional work. Originality, creativity and direct observation of subject matter is stressed. Students will work in dry, wet and mixed media.

  • Art II. Art II courses are a continuation of Art I, with a stronger emphasis on student-led concentrated use of the Principles and Elements of Design. Students will work with two-dimension and three dimensional materials. Originality, creativity and direct observation of subject matter is stressed. Students will work in dry, wet and mixed media.

  • Advanced Art. Advanced art courses include Art III and Art IV. Students in these courses are encouraged to choose their own medium to work in and begin to work towards a specialization. Students are expected to have a firm grasp of the Principles and Elements of Design as well as compositional and color theory and to display these in all works. Originality, creativity and direct observation of subject matter is stressed. Students may work in dry, wet and mixed media. Advanced art students will work towards a portfolio of work as the culminating experience.

  • Drawing/Painting.  Drawing/Painting students work specifically with those mediums. Course work includes a concentrated study of the Principles and Elements of Design, composition and a deeper use of color theory. Originality, creativity and direct observation of subject matter is stressed. Students will work in dry, wet and mixed media.

  • Advanced Placement Studio Art. AP Studio Art students work towards a culminating portfolio to be submitted to the College Board. 

Visual Art Standards. All Visual Art classes are based on the Kentucky Academic Standards for Visual Art. High school visual art standards begin on page 574. These standards are based on the four artistic processes of Creating, Presenting, Responding and Connecting. 

Further emphasis is placed on the Jessamine County Schools Arts Power Standards:

  • Artists use creativity and innovative thinking.

  • Artists investigate and experiment while creating toward a goal.

  • Artists create and interact with objects, people, and the environment that influence their work.

  • Artists improve their craft through practice, critique, reflection, and refinement.

  • Artists develop understanding and appreciation of self, others, and their work through engagement with art.

Visual Art students are encouraged to explore ideas and concepts important to them in their artwork. However, artworks that portray tobacco or vaping products, alcohol or drugs or which promote or suggest lewd, profane, vulgar, racist or violent themes are unacceptable. Further, works which are intended to insult, ridicule or bully another person or group are also unacceptable.  

Though students may emulate the works of contemporary or classical artists, all student work should be the student’s original work or from direct observation. Assignments will vary between teacher-driven and student-driven ideas. 

All students are expected to work with care in the art room. By its very nature, an art room can be messy and the risk of students staining clothes or damaging personal property is present. All students are responsible for themselves and their property. Aprons are available for students to cover their clothes. Personal property should be kept secured and away from work areas to avoid damage. Four sinks, paper towels and hand soap are provided in the classroom. Students may work with scissors and on occasion craft knives or a paper cutter (under supervision), but must also be personally responsible to handle these materials with caution. Every effort is made to ensure that the art materials are non-toxic and water soluble. If a student is sensitive to materials, every effort will be made to provide alternative materials to work with. 

Student assessment. Criteria considered in assessing student works include: 

  • Creativity. How the student addressed the problem/assignment, students own ‘voice’ is evident, went beyond the basic concept of the assignment. 

  • Concentrated use of compositional elements. The student shows a skilled and obvious use of the Principles and Elements of Design, shows continual improvement. 

  • Craftsmanship. The student demonstrates skilled use of the materials and neatness of the finished product, is conservative of materials and keeps work area and equipment clean and in good condition for the next student. 

  • Effort. The student demonstrates a wise use of time and does not hinder other students from working, will make revisions of the work as necessary.

Graded Academic and Non-academic Factors. There are two broad categories for which students are assigned grades: academic factors, which relate directly to student mastery of standards and (more commonly in the arts) skills taught, and non-academic factors which relate to the student behaviors that allow them to be involved in and benefit from education. The chart below shows the academic and non-academic factors that are graded in Jessamine County high schools:

 

Graded Academic Factors

Possible Examples

Summative assessment of academic and occupational content art standards

 

●     Summative projects - academic and art content components

●     Summative performance tasks and skills assessments

Formal formative assessments (provides recordable information for each student; graded for accuracy)

 

●     Formative projects - art content components

●     Formative performance tasks/art skills assessments

Graded Non-Academic Factors:

Mastery Descriptors

Collaboration

●     Usually listens to, shares with, and supports the efforts of others; sometimes steps into leadership roles.

Participation (Academic Perseverance)

●     Usually focuses on in-class work and what needs to be done. Mostly self-directed.

Responsibility

●     Completes most assignment(s).


Weighting of Grades.

Category:

Weight:

Summative (Finished artworks, group and individual critiques, portfolio, etc.)

70%

Classwork (Formal Formative. Exercises or practice work leading up to finished works, etc.)

10%

Non-Academic (Collaboration, participation, responsibility)

10%

Cumulative Assessments (i.e., mid-terms, finals, benchmarks)

10%


Grading Scale. Jessamine County high schools use a five-point scale for communicating student performance on both academic and non-academic measures. Mastery, as defined by Jessamine County teacher leadership, is when a student can consistently and independently (with IEP/PSP/504 accommodations as needed) demonstrate complete understanding of the entire standard or (art) skill, while proficiency denotes the point at which a student can demonstrate understanding of the standard or (art) skill most of the time, but may not yet be consistent. This scale shall be used to grade all academic factors and to determine final grades.

5

A

Distinguished

4.5

A

 

4

A

Mastery

3.5

B

 

3

B

Proficient

2.5

C

 

2

C

Developing

1.5

D

 

1

F

Limited knowledge/skills

0.5

F

 

0

F

No evidence of knowledge/skills


 

Non-academic factors are graded with the following rubric:

Factor

5
Distinguished

4
Mastery

3
Proficient

2
Developing

1
Limited Knowledge or Skills

No Evidence of Knowledge or Skills 

Collaboration

Consistently listens to, shares with, and supports the efforts of others; exhibits leadership. 

Usually listens to, shares with, and supports the efforts of others; sometimes steps into leadership roles.

Often listens to, shares, with, and supports the efforts of others; good team member.

Often listens to, shares with, and supports the efforts of others; sometimes is not a good team member. 

Rarely listens to, shares with, and supports the efforts of others; often is not a good team member. 

No evidence of listening to, sharing with, or supporting the efforts of others; no evidence of attempt to be a good team member.

Participation and Perseverance

Consistently stays focused on in-class work and what needs to be done. Very self-directed.

Usually focuses on in-class work and what needs to be done. Mostly self-directed.

Focuses on in-class work and what needs to be done most of the time with few reminders or redirects.

Focuses on the task and what needs to be done some of the time. Often must be reminded by the teacher about staying on task.**

Rarely focuses on class work and does not complete in-class assignments in a timely manner.

No evidence of focus on classwork and/or no evidence of work completion.

Responsibility

Completes all assignments

Completes most assignments

Completes some assignments, but has some gaps that do not interfere substantially with communication of student work.

Completes some assignments, but has gaps that interfere with communication of student work.

Does not complete the majority of assignment OR rarely completes assignments.

No assignment completed.